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Home Publications Blogs Beat the Press Can the Good People of Wisconsin Afford 2.8-4.0 cents a Week for High Speed Rail?

Can the Good People of Wisconsin Afford 2.8-4.0 cents a Week for High Speed Rail?

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Monday, 04 October 2010 20:35

According to the New York Times, Scott Walker, the Republican candidate for governor is worried that they can't. Of course, the NYT did not make the issue quite this clear to readers.

It told readers that Mr. Walker is worried that subsidies to high speed rail could cost Wisconsin $7-$10 million a year. It would be necessary to divide by Wisconsin's population of 5.6 million to realize that an expenditure of 2.8-4.0 cents a week is a high item on the Republican gubernatorial candidate's list of concerns.

(Thanks C. Mike for catching my initial error.)

Comments (4)Add Comment
That's more than $1 per year!
written by Erik, October 05, 2010 3:08
Do I look like I'm made of money?! You tax-and-spend liberals, sheesh.
Er
written by CMike, October 05, 2010 4:45
$7 million per year divided by 5.6 million people equals $1.25 per person per year or 2.4 cents a week per person.

$10 million per year divided by 5.6 million people equals $1.79 per person per year or 3.4 cents a week per person.
Re: Er
written by Erik, October 05, 2010 6:10
This changes everything! :-D
...
written by izzatzo, October 05, 2010 8:18
If all the subsidies used to produce gasoline were ended and reflected directly in its price, it would be over $15/gallon. Anyone switching from gasoline use to high speed rail is not being "subsidized" from this perspective, instead reducing net total subsidies.

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About Beat the Press

Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He is the author of several books, his latest being The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive. Read more about Dean.

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