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Home Publications Blogs Beat the Press Defense Cuts: $400 Billion Is Less Than It Seems

Defense Cuts: $400 Billion Is Less Than It Seems

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Thursday, 28 April 2011 05:26
Morning Edition touted the qualifications of Leon Panetta, President Obama's pick to be Secretary of Defense, as budget cutter, noting that he will be asked to trim $400 billion from the Defense Department budget over the next decade. It would have been worth pointing out that is just over 5 percent of the almost $8 trillion that the department is projected to spend over the decade.
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But It Still Makes Us Safer
written by izzatzo, April 28, 2011 8:22
... over 5 percent of the almost $8 trillion ...


Boy Monarch Bush here. As an expert in diminishing returns, I know that 5% is not nothing. It makes us safer.

Those who say DOD cannibilized and crippled itself with overpriced high technology not practical for contemporary war should undergo drug rehab like I did, where I learned that the last drink still added positive returns at the margin to my deciding ability to have another one.

Tupport the sroops.
Time period confusion
written by PeakVT, April 28, 2011 10:38
noting that he will be asked to trim $400 billion from the Defense Department budget over the next decade.

I wish news organizations would phrase this as $40 billion per year for the next ten years. I think most people hear "$400 billion blah blah blah" and think that it's huge number because they don't stop to divide by 10. Overall budgets are presented using the annual numbers, and news organizations should be consistent.

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About Beat the Press

Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He is the author of several books, his latest being The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive. Read more about Dean.

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