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Home Publications Blogs Beat the Press Erskine Bowles Gets $350,000 a Year from Morgan Stanley

Erskine Bowles Gets $350,000 a Year from Morgan Stanley

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Thursday, 04 August 2011 04:26

For some reason the media never find room to mention the fact that Erskine Bowles is a director of Wall Street investment bank Morgan Stanley (an otherwise bankrupt beneficiary of the bailout). Bowles was a co-chair of President Obama's deficit commission and is now apparently one of the people whose name is being mentioned as a possible successor to Timothy Geithner if he were to resign as Treasury Secretary.

If Bowles was getting $350,000 a year from the United Auto Workers it seems likely that it would be mentioned in news reports. It's not clear why the media do not think his ties to a major Wall Street bank are relevant.

Comments (3)Add Comment
Erskin is Nolo Contendere: Leave Him Alone - He Can Help
written by izzatzo, August 04, 2011 8:36
So Erskin is on welfare like everyone else. Why is this a problem? Why single him out? Stop the gotcha games and get serious. We're all in this together and we must pull together to get out of it.

Stupid liberals.
Erskine is a Very Serious Person Who Wants to Cut SS
written by Paul, August 04, 2011 9:58
Naturally the MSM will disregard the fact that he is being paid by Wall Street since cutting SS & Medicare is also the unanimous agenda of the MSM.

If Erskine instead suggested gutting the Defense Department, he would be ridiculed as a charlatan.
Reality
written by JL, August 04, 2011 1:10
Wall Street firms have more $ to spend to influence opinions and buy more newpspaper ads. Nobody wants to have a fight with them.

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About Beat the Press

Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He is the author of several books, his latest being The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive. Read more about Dean.

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