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Home Publications Blogs Beat the Press Jobs, Regulation, and Republican Nonsense: Do Post Readers Really Have More Time to Investigate Issues Than Its Reporters?

Jobs, Regulation, and Republican Nonsense: Do Post Readers Really Have More Time to Investigate Issues Than Its Reporters?

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Thursday, 05 May 2011 05:08

The Post apparently believes that its readers have more time and expertise to evaluate the claims of politicians than its reporters. How else can one explain the he said/she said piece on jobs programs that the Post ran today?

The article featured Democrats demanding new government programs to create jobs while the Republicans insisted that excessive regulation was the problem. If the latter were true it would be necessary to explain why excessive regulation did not prevent the economy from creating 3 million jobs a year from 1996 to 2000. A real newspaper would have devoted some space to evaluating the competing claims of the two parties.

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written by Fed Up, May 05, 2011 2:01
"The article featured Democrats demanding new government programs to create jobs while the Republicans insisted that excessive regulation was the problem."

No, the problem is people are trying to grow real aggregate supply more than real aggregate demand and using debt (whether private or gov't) to do it.

What is needed is more retirees.
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written by John Q, May 05, 2011 2:36
"A real newspaper would have devoted some space to evaluating the competing claims of the two parties."

The "dispute-over-shape-of-the-Earth" style of reporting shows no sign of going away. After all, it would be partisan to point out that one party to the dispute is totally wrong, wouldn't it?

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About Beat the Press

Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He is the author of several books, his latest being The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive. Read more about Dean.

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