CEPR - Center for Economic and Policy Research

Multimedia

En Español

Em Português

Other Languages

Home Publications Blogs Beat the Press Look Mom, No Patents: Cheap Test for Cervical Cancer Developed With Public Funding

Look Mom, No Patents: Cheap Test for Cervical Cancer Developed With Public Funding

Print
Sunday, 02 June 2013 20:09

Great story in the Washington Post (in the sense of very good news) about the successful trial in India of a cheap vinegar test for cervical cancer. According to the article this cheap and easy to administer test can substantially increase the early detection of this cancer. This test can save the lives of tens of thousands of women in India and elsewhere in the developing world who do not have access to more expensive tests.

An interesting and important sidebar is that it seems that this test was developed with support from the National Institutes of Health and an Indian non-profit. This perhaps should not be surprising, but many advocates of patent supported research insist that people become stupid when they get public funding. The success of this test, which holds the promise of enormous gains in public health, shows again that it is possible to have innovations that do not depend on patent support.

Comments (2)Add Comment
Why Advocates of Patents are Not Stupid
written by Last Mover, June 02, 2013 9:50

... but many advocates of patent supported research insist that people become stupid when they get public funding.


Wait for it. Since vinegar consists of acetic acid based in bacteria, once Monsanto hears of this it will surely introduce a patented genetically modified version that infests the breeding ground of the original version, then sue everyone for stealing it as the price of vinegar is increased one thousand percent so those women never see a cheap cancer test again.
Where are the free traders now?
written by GA, June 03, 2013 10:15
Depressing article:
http://www.washingtonian.com/a...index.php

In short, critical nutrients for IV care for premature babies - difficult stuff like calcium are in severe shortage.

And the whole way through it, a normal response would seem to be, if we need this stuff, ummm, maybe we could buy it? From some other country?

But no, that's illegal. And for some reason, I don't here the free trade ideologues bringing up this case.

Write comment

(Only one link allowed per comment)

This content has been locked. You can no longer post any comments.

busy
 

CEPR.net
Support this blog, donate
Combined Federal Campaign #79613

About Beat the Press

Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He is the author of several books, his latest being The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive. Read more about Dean.

Archives