CEPR - Center for Economic and Policy Research

Multimedia

En Español

Em Português

Other Languages

Home Publications Blogs Beat the Press Pharma Tracks Doctors' Prescribing Patterns

Pharma Tracks Doctors' Prescribing Patterns

Print
Monday, 25 April 2011 04:50
The NYT reports on how drug companies are getting access to databases that allow them to track individual doctors' prescribing practices. This information can be helpful in better pitching their drugs to doctors. This is yet another abuse of the sort that economists predict happens when the government imposes monopolies (i.e. patents) that raise prices far above marginal cost. If economists paid attention to the $300 billion industry, they would be looking for more efficient mechanisms for financing prescription drug research.
Comments (2)Add Comment
Big Pharma, Big Brother
written by izzatzo, April 25, 2011 6:07
This information can be helpful in better pitching their drugs to doctors.


It's not just Big Pharma. Big Brothers everywhere in the private sector have the same incentives for the same reason that make Big Brother Government look like an amateur.

Extracting detailed personal information from captured customers then force feeding them into locked in 'choices' they can't get out of is the rule rather than the exception.

There was once a time in 'free markets' when that information belonged to the buyers rather than stolen by the sellers.
IT'S NOT JUST PHARMA
written by Paul, April 25, 2011 4:43
All the medical device manufacturers, e.g., heart stents, do exactly the same thing and systematically pitch doctors and hospitals that do a lot of procedures by rewarding them with speaking fees and other funding for "studies". This practice is very widespread.

Write comment

(Only one link allowed per comment)

This content has been locked. You can no longer post any comments.

busy
 

CEPR.net
Support this blog, donate
Combined Federal Campaign #79613

About Beat the Press

Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He is the author of several books, his latest being The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive. Read more about Dean.

Archives