Robert Samuelson Didn't Hear About the Recession

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Monday, 10 May 2010 04:58

That is the only thing that readers of his column on the "death spiral" of the welfare state can conclude. After all, he notes the size of the budget deficits facing various European countries, but discusses them entirely in the context of their wlefare states. He apparently does not know that these countries all face severe downturns as a result of the collapse of housing bubbles in the United States and elsewhere. During recessions budget deficits always expand as tax collections fall and spending on items like unemployment insurance and other benefits rise.

Contrary to what Samuelson claims in this column. Most European countries have been willing to pay the taxes needed to support their welfare states. And this has not prevented them from maintaining rates of productivity growth (the long-term determinant of living standards) comparable to the United States.

The economic crisis caused by the collapse of the housing bubble does make sustaining the welfare state more difficult, just as it makes every other aspect of economic life more difficult. This points to the need to have more competent people setting monetary policy (unfortunately, none of the incompetent central bankers have been fired), but it does not provide insights into the viability of the welfare state, which is most needed in times of economic hardship.