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Home Publications Blogs Beat the Press The New York Times Uses Its News Section to Express Its Dislike of the Welfare State

The New York Times Uses Its News Section to Express Its Dislike of the Welfare State

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Saturday, 23 October 2010 07:33

A NYT news article described the strikes in France over the increase in the retirement age as being:

"a cents-and-euros struggle to avert the inevitable moment when decades of cumulative benefits — from short work weeks to long vacations, from state health care to early retirement — begin to unravel."

The article presents no evidence as to why it is inevitable that "decades of cumulative benefits begin to unravel." Nor does it present any statements from any expert who supports this view.

In fact, since productivity in France is growing through time (i.e. it is producing more in each hour of work), there is no reason whatsoever that its benefits need unravel. Workers can continue to enjoy increases in after-tax wages while maintaining the welfare state at its current level.

The comment about the "inevitable" unraveling of the French welfare state is an expression of distaste on the part of the NYT that should be left to the opinion pages. 

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...
written by izzatzo, October 23, 2010 9:36
Workers can continue to enjoy increases in after-tax wages while maintaining the welfare state at its current level.


Juan Williams agrees. If you can't extract your welfare from NPR, there's always Fox News with enough of a productivity increase reflected in the pay raise to support both.

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About Beat the Press

Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He is the author of several books, his latest being The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive. Read more about Dean.

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