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Home Publications Blogs Beat the Press Washington Post Wrongly Claims that the Republican Medicare Plan Will Have "Sizable Savings in Future Costs"

Washington Post Wrongly Claims that the Republican Medicare Plan Will Have "Sizable Savings in Future Costs"

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Wednesday, 20 April 2011 05:13

According to the Congressional Budget Office's projections, the Republican Medicare plan will actually lead to an enormous increase in health care costs. Its projections imply that the cost of buying Medicare equivalent insurance would rise by $30 trillion over Medicare's 75-year planning period. This amount is approximately 6 times the size of the projected Social Security shortfall.

Therefore the Post was incorrect in claiming that the Republican plan would lead to sizable cost savings, although the government's payments for Medicare would be reduced.

Comments (4)Add Comment
...
written by izzatzo, April 20, 2011 7:01
This amount is approximately 6 times the size of the projected Social Security shortfall.


This is the new Death Panel Voucher Choice 6X Accelerator feature added to health care policy that also reduces the Social Security shortfall with shortened lifespans.

At least one has more options for the final exit, not to mention the heroic legacy left behind for saving the younger generation from subsistence on indentured debt to higher taxes.
...
written by Albert, April 20, 2011 7:32
All that red ink in Ryan's P2P chart, doesn't just disappear, it gets shifted onto the backs of seniors and their families.

Seniors will have to spend down into poverty to get basic health care in the Republican future :-(
In Fairness to Foxies
written by JHM, April 20, 2011 11:45
The F-15 Squadron can be very annoying with their crypto-neoreaction, but there is nevertheless still such a thing as being hypercritical.

Let us put a little context around the foxwords:

The Republican budget plan, drafted by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (Wis.) and approved by the House last week, calls for a major restructuring of Medicare and Medicaid, with SIZABLE SAVINGS in future costs. Obama, in his plan, opposes the GOP’s restructuring, but he has said that future savings will be needed to keep Medicare solvent.

One has to really go out of one's way, I think, to misunderstand that to imply anything very much like "sizable reductions in personal expenditure by sick geezers." And to pretend to misunderstand would be _vix dignum_, scarcely worthy of the ethical and intellectual level upon which the pressbeating process ought to be conducted.

There is an organization obscurely abbreviated "C.E.P.R." that has discovered [ http://j.mp/hsyB46 ] that "[T]he plan is quite explicitly intended to reduce the government’s payments for Medicare." Being mad dog liberals, these acronymous gentry do not care to admit in so many words that SmirkCare [ http://j.mp/eTZPbw ] would indeed achieve that explicit intention, but nondenial from so hostile a source is, I think, tantamount to confirmation.

(( Exactly what the POTUS of us all understands by ‘solvency’ in conjunction with taxpayer-funded medicine is not as clear to me as I wish it were: perhaps he will explain eventually. But that is another story. ))

Moreover, the general tenor of the Fox-on-Fifteenth article is not likely to please the Smirk of Janesville much. This amateur finds myself continually wishing to beat the press for headlines that suggest an editorial inability to understand the story headlined, but not in this case: "Poll finds little backing for debt remedies
Americans disapprove of how Obama and GOP are handling the issue" will do well enough.


  • Happy days.

    ___
  • If the Smirk were about ten times bestembrighter than I can manage to take him for, he might be somewhat consoled by the pollsters’ discovery that "Americans prefer to keep Medicare just the way it is." That seems to coincide exactly with the first third of his own Thirty Year Plan. Not only as The Plan is expounded by himself, but also as it has been CliffsNo™ed by the CEPRsters in their "Figure One" -- not, of course, to be confused with their "Table One" -- on the last page of _op. cit._.

    Am I the only one who thinks of Mr. Harold Wilson's "A week is a long time in politics" as soon as statesmen -- and CEPRsters -- start going on about the human events of 2012 or 2035 in relentless Technicolor detail?

    Well, we'll see.







  • Why would Democrats not want the ex
    written by Floccina, April 20, 2011 11:53
    All that red ink in Ryan's P2P chart, doesn't just disappear, it gets shifted onto the backs of seniors and their families.


    I am for progressive taxation but why is it good for low income young people to pay for high wealth seniors?

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    About Beat the Press

    Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He is the author of several books, his latest being The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive. Read more about Dean.

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