Why Is the NYT Editorial Board So Protectionist When It Comes to Doctors?

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Sunday, 20 July 2014 04:43

Most economists agree that trade is one of the main reasons that less-educated workers have seen a decline in their relative wages over the last three decades. The story is pretty straightforward. Trade policy has been designed to put manufacturing workers in the United States in direct competition with workers in developing countries like Mexico or China, who sometimes earn less than $1 an hour. This causes many workers in the United States to lose their job and puts serious downward pressure on the wages of workers who manage to keep their jobs.

Given this fact, it is striking that trade, or more precisely allowing more foreign doctors to practice in the United States, does not even rate mention in a NYT editorial on a prospective doctor shortage. Doctors in other wealthy countries get paid on average about half of what they get in the United States. Doctors in developing countries get paid even less. This suggests the possibility of enormous gains from allowing more foreign doctors into the country to bring wages of physicians here in line with those in other wealthy countries. (We could easily compensate developing countries for losing doctors by providing them with the money to educate two or three doctors for every one that comes here -- please think about that one for a minute before writing a silly complaint about brain drain.)  

Anyhow, it striking that the class bias in trade policy is so extreme that any policy that is designed to provide even limited protection for less-educated workers, such as the temporary tariffs on imported steel that President Bush imposed in 2002, are immediately denounced as protectionist by all right-thinking people. Yet trade can not even be discussed, even when there is potential for enormous gains, if the losers would be highly-educated professionals like doctors.