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Home Publications Blogs CEPR Blog Labor Market Policy Research Reports, Sept. 26 – Oct. 7, 2011

Labor Market Policy Research Reports, Sept. 26 – Oct. 7, 2011

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Written by Alexandra Mitukiewicz   
Friday, 07 October 2011 15:30

A roundup of the labor market research reports released this week and last week.


Center for American Progress

Redefining Teacher Pensions: Strategically Defined Benefits for New Teachers and Fiscal Sustainability for All
Raegen Miller


CLASP-CEPR

How Much Does Employee Turnover Really Cost Your Business?


Demos

The State Of Massachusetts' Middle Class
Tamara Draut


Economic Policy Institute

Regulatory uncertainty: A phony explanation for our jobs problem
Lawrence Mishel

Hispanic unemployment highest in Northeast metropolitan areas
Algernon Austin

High black unemployment widespread across nation’s metropolitan areas
Algernon Austin

Ohio public employees are not overcompensated: Rebutting a diversion from Senate Bill 5
Jeffrey H. Keefe

H-2B employers and their congressional allies are fighting hard to keep wages low for immigrant and American workers
Daniel Costa


Employment Policy Research Network

Labor Underutilization and Deep Job Deficit Problems in Massachusetts and the U.S.
Andrew Sum, Joseph McLaughlin, Ishwar Khatiwada, Sheila Palma and Mykhaylo Trubskyy


National Employment Law Project

The President’s American Jobs Act of 2011: Responding to the National Crisis of Long-Term Unemployment
Maurice Emsellem and George Wentworth

Tags: labor market

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