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The AAPI Perspective on the Recession and the Recovery

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Written by Nicole Woo   
Thursday, 26 May 2011 14:15

Yesterday, CEPR was honored to present some our research at the 2011 Asian American and Pacific Islander Summit, hosted by the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC) and House Democratic Leadership.

CEPR's presention, titled The AAPI Perspective on the Recession and the Recovery (pdf), was part of the Summit's Economic Development and Housing Panel.

Our main points were:

1. AAPIs suffered just as much as other racial/ethnic groups in the recession.

2. Aggregate data about AAPIs mask remarkable diversity within the AAPI community.

3. “Good policy requires good data.”  There is a need for better disaggregated data about AAPIs.

4. CEPR will release a major report about AAPI workers in July.  This presentation is a preview of that work.

For example, the slide below shows that from 2006 (the year before the recession started) to 2009, the median income of AAPIs dropped about the same as other groups:

AAPI-HHincome

And this slide points out that, while the aggregate data show that AAPIs have the lowest unemployment rate, it actually masks a wide range of unemployment rates among AAPI ethnic subgroups:

AAPI-unemployment

Click here (pdf) to view the entire presentation.

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