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Haiti: Relief and Reconstruction

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Does Camp Corail Demonstrate How Haiti Relief Can Be Done Right? Print
Monday, 26 April 2010 12:34
Jonathan M. Katz reports for the Associated Press on the glaring gap in services between two camps; Camp Corail and Camp Obama. Camp Corail is the recently opened camp which is housing those that have been relocated, primarily from the Petionville camp. Katz explains:
The organized relocation camp at Corail-Cesselesse has thousands of spacious, hurricane-resistant tents on groomed, graded mountain soil. The settlement three miles (four kilometers) down the road — named after the U.S. president in hopes of getting attention from foreigners — has leaky plastic tarps and wooden sticks pitched on a muddy slope.

Corail has a stocked U.N. World Food Program warehouse for its 3,000-and-counting residents; the more than 8,500 at Camp Obama are desperate for food and water. Corail's entrance is guarded by U.N. peacekeepers and Haitian police. Camp Obama's residents put up a Haitian flag to mark their empty security tent.
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Moratorium on Forced Evictions Print
Friday, 23 April 2010 14:55
On April 17 International Action Ties, via the Haiti Response Coalition, called for an immediate suspension of forced evictions. The group called on authorities to respect the human rights of displaced peoples, efforts would include a moratorium on evictions, an independent monitoring agency and collaboration with community groups. The group notes that the United Nations' Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement have not been followed. The press release begins:
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CBS Evening News: Relief Efforts "Certainly Not Good Enough" Print
Thursday, 22 April 2010 09:06
CBS Evening News with Katie Couric continues their Haiti coverage by looking at conditions in the IDP camps. Couric speaks with Dr. Louis Ivers of Partners in Health, who argues that sanitation, shelter, and security are all inadequate. When Katie Couric asks Dr. Ivers what the problem is, Ivers responds:
"Somebody's not doing their job right. Because, if this is as good as we can do, it's certainly not good enough."
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Forced Eviction, Lack of Coordination Mar Relocation Efforts Print
Tuesday, 20 April 2010 15:21
The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) reports on relocation efforts ahead of the rainy season. CSM notes that many displaced people have been forced out of their camps, with bulldozers destroying their tents. The article also points to a lack of coordination in the relocation efforts, generally slowing progress and resulting in people having to move multiple times. CSM writes:
For some, the place is called Mais 54 Caradeux. For others, Toto Camp, and yet others still, Toussaint Louverture camp, in honor of the leader of the revolution that led to Haiti’s independence.

Regardless, the future of the 1,507 registered families living on this dusty, rolling terrain is uncertain.

About two weeks ago, government bulldozers showed up after dark and, without warning, began to level the haphazard maze of bed sheets and sticks. People grabbed what they could before their homes toppled.
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Los Angeles Times: Rainy season threatens earthquake-battered Haiti Print
Tuesday, 20 April 2010 11:24

The Los Angeles Times reported on Sunday about the upcoming rainy season and efforts made in preparation by both aid agencies and the government. While rains have already begun, they are set to increase in both intensity and frequency over the coming months. Despite dire warnings and months of preparation Haiti is still not ready for the rains, reports the Times. Thousands of Haitians are in extremely vulnerable areas, however relocation efforts have been delayed and only just recently have gotten under way. In the meantime, the rains continue to make life miserable in the make shift camps that are home to hundreds of thousands of displaced people. The Los Angeles Times writes:

The rainy season is bearing down, and Haiti is not ready.

Three months after the earthquake killed more than 200,000 people, more than 2.1 million Haitians are still living in tents and under tarps, many on dangerous hillsides and tidal flats.

Ernst Y'Voyelle, 38, studies those clouds warily from his hut clinging to the edge of a ravine in a hillside tent camp where as many as 50,000 people live.

"There's going to be a lot of people buried here," he said.
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TransAfrica Forum Report on Forced Evictions, Neglect in Camps Print
Friday, 16 April 2010 09:21
TransAfrica Forum published a report today from their partners in the Haiti Response Coalition documenting forced evictions and neglect in IDP camps over the last week. The first situation occured at an encampment in Caradeux Delmas 75, Port-au-Prince, which consists of four conjoined camps; Camp Benediction, CCTT, Camp Canaan and Refugee Camp. The Coalition reports:
The Refugee Camp community members reports that they did not receive warning before the large Conseil Nationale Equipements (CNE) bulldozers and graters came to their community with Haitian National Police escorts late on Sunday evening 04APR10, shorts after 7:00pm. With consistency, numerous individuals reported that the uniformed officers first threatened the families with violence if they did not leave their homes immediately. The assesment team was informed that anyone who argued was then forced out with violence. The use of batons were reported, and firearms were discharged into the air.
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Deputy UN Secretary General: "Situation Remains Dire" Print
Thursday, 15 April 2010 16:57
Deputy UN Secretary General Asha-Rose Migiro, speaking to reports at the UN upon returning from a visit to Haiti said that, "Though commendable progress has been made there since Jan. 12, when the earthquake struck, the situation remains dire," reports Xinhua.

Over three months after the earthquake and with the rainy season already beginning, there is still much to be done. On April 13 Red Cross Federation spokesman Alex Wynter said that the number in need of shelter was raised from 1.3 million to 1.5 million. This means there are still some 300,000 people without shelter. Further, as OCHA noted in their most recent update only about a quarter of households have received any rope or other materials to secure their shelters, which "remains a vital gap in the response" as many thousands of shelters will need to be strengthened for the rains. The rains are often too strong for the tarps, as has been documented by video, and as reported by the International Federation of the Red Cross earlier in the week.
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Increasing Reports of Forced Evictions at IDP Camps Print
Tuesday, 13 April 2010 14:12
AFP reported yesterday on concerns that the homeless are being forcibly evicted from their settlements. This echoes reports from last week on efforts to force those staying at the Saint Louis de Gonzague school off the grounds. AFP writes:
The aid group Action Against Hunger on Sunday slammed Haiti's forced evictions of hundreds of homeless quake victims from the pitch of the country's national stadium.
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Concerns About Shelter and Sanitation Persist Three Months After Earthquake Print
Tuesday, 13 April 2010 11:26
The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) released their updated Situation Report today (PDF). The report reveals that the distribution of shelter materials has reached 90 percent of those in need, and is on track to reach 100 percent by the May 1 goal. Nevertheless, worries remain that even with tarps, the rainy season could still cause an immense disaster. OCHA notes that:
With only 20,243 tool kits reported as distributed and 81,000 households with ropes and fixings provision, this remains a vital gap in the response. A large number of emergency shelters constructed will require strengthening for the rainy season.
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Sean Penn: Agencies Must Spend Money Allocated to Them, Act Decisively Ahead of Rainy Season Print
Friday, 09 April 2010 09:52
On CNN's Anderson Cooper 360 last night they looked at relocation plans, asking the important question, why have things moved so slowly? First CNN correspondent Gary Tuchman travels to the first planned relocation site, which will open on Sunday. Tuchman asks a member of the presidential task force why things have taken so long:
"It ought to be done faster. But you have to coordinate it with the U.S. Army, the Corps of Engineers, with the U.N. people, with the European community, with the Oxfam, all a bunch of actors, together."
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