CEPR - Center for Economic and Policy Research

Multimedia

En Español

Em Português

Other Languages

Home Publications Blogs CEPR Blog



Labor Market Policy Research Reports, April 9 to 16 Print
Written by CEPR   
Thursday, 16 April 2015 15:19

The following reports on labor market policy were recently released:

Center for American Progress

Women of Color and the Gender Wage Gap
Milia Fisher

Hours Flexibility and the Gender Gap in Pay
Claudia Goldin

Economic Policy Institute

The Trans-Pacific Partnership Is Unlikely to Be a Good Deal for American Workers
Josh Bivens

Center for Economic and Policy Research

Partners in Austerity: Jamaica, the United States and the International Monetary Fund
Jake Johnston

Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Access to Paid Sick Time in Los Angeles, California
Jessica Milli and Daria Ulbina

The Status of Women in the States: 2015 — Poverty & Opportunity
Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Women in the Construction Trades: Earnings, Workplace Discrimination, and the Promise of Green Jobs
Ariane Hegewisch and Brigid O'Farrell

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2014 and by Race and Ethnicity
Ariane Hegewisch and Emily Ellis

National Employment Law Project

The Growing Movement for $15
Irene Tung, Yannet Lathrop, and Paul Sonn

Institute for Research on Labor and Employment (UCLA)

Eyes on Labor: Documentaries on Work in the Neoliberal Era
Judy Branfman

Urban Institute

Promoting Social and Economic Mobility in Washington, DC
Gregory Acs, Lauren Eyster, and Jonathan Schwabish

 
Leaving the Right Way Print
Written by Nicholas Buffie   
Thursday, 16 April 2015 11:15

One of the most underutilized sources for labor market data is the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS). The survey provides valuable information on a host of topics, including how and why people leave their jobs.

JOLTS tracks the number of “total [job] separations” that occur in any one month. They break these job separations down into three categories: “quits,” “layoffs and discharges,” and “other separations.” According to the April news release of the February JOLTS data, the “other separations” category includes “separations due to retirement, death, and disability, as well as transfers to other locations of the same firm.”

Read more...

 

 
Labor Market Policy Research Reports, April 2 to 9 Print
Written by CEPR   
Friday, 10 April 2015 14:00

The following reports on labor market policy were recently released:

Economic Policy Institute

Irregular Work Scheduling and Its Consequences
Lonnie Golden

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

EITC and Child Tax Credit Promote Work, Reduce Poverty, and Support Children’s Development, Research Finds
Chuck Marr, Chye-Ching Huang, Arloc Sherman, and Brandon DeBot

Center for Law and Social Policy and National Employment Law Project

Access to Unemployment Insurance Benefits for Family Caregivers: An Analysis of State Rules and Practices
Liz Ben-Ishai, Rick McHugh, and Kathleen Ujvari

National Employment Law Project

Fair Chance – Ban the Box Toolkit: Opening Job Opportunities for People with Records
Michelle Natividad Rodriguez & Anastasia Christman

Urban Institute

Earned Income Tax Credit in the United States
Elaine Maag

 
Retirement Incomes are Falling for Many Americans, Despite What AEI Wants You to Think Print
Written by David Rosnick   
Thursday, 09 April 2015 11:00

In a new paper from the American Enterprise Institute, Andrew Biggs and Sylvester Schieber argue that workers; retirements are more secure financially than some suggest. In part, they point to the ratio of household assets to wage earnings for those with heads aged 45 to 54. While their criticisms may have some validity, there are some significant omissions that cut the other way. On balance, it is likely that most households will rely more heavily on Social Security to support their retirements than in prior years.

According to the Survey of Consumer Finances, on average household wealth for the 45 to 54 age group fell from 5.8 years of wages in 2007 to 4.7 in 2013.1 Household wealth here—consistent with Biggs and Schieber-- includes the value of a home and any other real estate, plus financial wealth. Mortgages and other debt are subtracted to get this number, as seen in Figure 1.

Read more...

 

 
Giving People Money Instead of Food Stamps Would Not Lead to an Honest Debate Print
Written by Shawn Fremstad   
Monday, 06 April 2015 15:39

Under a bill recently introduced in the Missouri legislature, people who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits would not be able to use them to buy cookies, seafood, and certain other foods. In response, Matthew Yglesias argues we should “give poor people money instead of food stamps … [t]hen we could have an honest debate about how much money we want to spend on making poor people’s lives easier, without a lot of red herrings about steak dinners.” 

The Missouri legislation is a very bad idea, but there is little reason to think that providing SNAP benefits in the form of “cash” that could be spent on anything rather than vouchers for food would result in the honest debate Yglesias and I would both like to see. The more likely result would be a far worse and less honest debate, one that would only further undercut the modest consumption floor the SNAP program currently provides to millions of struggling people. 

Read more...

 

 
Labor Market Policy Research Reports, March 26 to April 2 Print
Written by CEPR   
Friday, 03 April 2015 13:00

The following reports on labor market policy were recently released:

Center for American Progress

Economic Snapshot: March 2015
Christian E. Weller and Jackie Odum

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

SNAP Benefit Boost in 2009 Recovery Act Provided Economic Stimulus and Reduced Hardship
Brynne Keith-Jennings and Dottie Rosenbaum

Read more...

 

 
Bad Weather Slows Job Growth in March Print
Written by Dean Baker   
Friday, 03 April 2015 10:00

The Labor Department reported that the economy added just 126,000 jobs in March, its weakest showing in two years. Downward revisions to the prior two month's data brought the three month average to 197,000. Clearly, weather played an important role in the weaker than expected report, as much of the Midwest and Northeast was hit by unusually severe weather in the second half of February and early March. As a result, construction lost 1,000 jobs after adding an average of 36,000 jobs in the prior four months. Manufacturing also lost 1,000 jobs after adding an average of 21,000 in the prior four months. Restaurants added 8,000 jobs in March, compared to an average of 43,000 a month from October to February. While not all of this slowdown was due to weather, it surely was an important factor.

Read more...

 

 
Is Private Equity Over the Hill? Print
Written by Eileen Appelbaum   
Wednesday, 01 April 2015 15:09

In a great piece in the Wall Street Journal, Andy Kessler argues that for private equity, the glory days are over.  It’s not that PE funds are having trouble raising money. With the stock market hovering near recent highs, PE funds – in the words of Apollo Chief Leon Black – are selling everything that’s not nailed down. Dow Jones LP Source reports that PE funds raised $266 billion in 2014 – an increase of 11.7 percent over 2013. But despite this success, all is not well with private equity.

Read more...

 

 
Labor Market Policy Research Reports, March 19 to 26 Print
Written by CEPR   
Friday, 27 March 2015 12:00

The following reports on labor market policy were recently released:

Economic Policy Institute

Projected Decline In Unemployment In 2015 Won’t Lift Blacks Out of the Recession-carved Crater
Valerie Wilson

Center for Economic and Policy Research

From Recession to Collapse: The Bush Administration and the Over-Valued Dollar
Dean Baker

Urban Institute

Reducing Poverty in the United States: Results of a Microsimulation Analysis of the Community Advocates Public Policy Institute Policy Package
Kye Lippold

 
The Real Rate of Recovery, Part 5: Long-Term Unemployment Print
Written by Nicholas Buffie and Kevin Cashman   
Thursday, 26 March 2015 10:00

Many media outlets cite the official unemployment rate – the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ U-3 unemployment rate – when reporting on the recovery in the jobs market. This rate stood at 5.0 percent in December 2007 (the first month of the recession) and rose to a high of 10.0 percent in October 2009; it has since fallen to 5.5 percent. Relative to its peak, the unemployment rate has made up 90 percent of the ground lost between December 2007 and October 2009. However, there are good reasons to think that the unemployment rate overstates the degree of recovery in the job market. We are presenting a series of five measures that provide insights on employment and unemployment that aren’t captured by the official unemployment rate. One such measure is discussed here.

Long-Term Unemployment as a Percentage of Total Unemployment

Long-term unemployment as a percentage of total unemployment shows us the share of unemployed Americans who have been out-of-work for 27 weeks or more.

Read more...

 

 
The Rise of Discouraged Workers Print
Written by Nicholas Buffie   
Wednesday, 25 March 2015 10:00

My colleague Kevin Cashman and I recently released a new measure of unemployment called the "Jobless Rate". The "Jobless Rate" takes account of all Americans who say they want a job but are unable to find one. While the official unemployment rate for February was just 5.5 percent, the jobless rate stood at 9.3 percent.

Read more...

 

 
The Real Rate of Recovery, Part 4: Involuntary Part-Time Employment Print
Written by Nicholas Buffie and Kevin Cashman   
Monday, 23 March 2015 10:00

Many media outlets cite the official unemployment rate – the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ U-3 unemployment rate – when reporting on the recovery in the jobs market. This rate stood at 5.0 percent in December 2007 (the first month of the recession) and rose to a high of 10.0 percent in October 2009; it has since fallen to 5.5 percent. Relative to its peak, the unemployment rate has made up 90 percent of the ground lost between December 2007 and October 2009. However, there are good reasons to think that the unemployment rate overstates the degree of recovery in the job market. We are presenting a series of five measures that provide insights on employment and unemployment that aren’t captured by the official unemployment rate. One such measure is discussed here.

Involuntary Part-Time Employment as a Percentage of Total Employment

Involuntary part-time employment, as a percentage of total employment, shows the percentage of Americans who work part-time for economic reasons but who would like to work full-time.

Read more...

 

 
Labor Market Policy Research Reports, March 13 to 19 Print
Written by CEPR   
Thursday, 19 March 2015 15:47

The following reports on labor market policy were recently released:

Economic Policy Institute

How to Raise Wages: Policies That Work and Policies That Don’t
Lawrence Mishel and Ross Eisenbrey

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

No Mystery Why SNAP Enrollment Remains High: It’s Still the Economy
Chad Stone, Arloc Sherman, and Brynne Keith-Jennings

Center for Law and Social Policy

The Effect of the Great Recession on Child Well-Being
Elias Blinkoff, Kate Sell, Laura Repcheck, Narissa Williams, and Rachel Meadows

National Employment Law Project

Building Robust Labor Standards Enforcement Regimes in Our Cities and Counties
Haeyoung Yoon and Tsedeye Gebreselassie

 
Latest Update at ceprDATA.org Print
Written by Cherrie Bucknor   
Thursday, 19 March 2015 11:00

Ever wonder where you can get access to the data we use for our papers? Look no further than ceprDATA.org, a website where we provide consistent, (relatively!) user-friendly versions of the Current Population Survey (CPS), American Community Survey (ACS), and other datasets used at CEPR.

Version 2.0 of our CPS Outgoing Rotation Group extract for 1979-2014 was posted last week. You can download the data or view the program files we used to create the extracts we use in-house. CEPR CPS Basic Monthly program files for 1994-2014 have also been updated and are available for download.

Read more...

 

 
The #PeoplesBudget: A Progressive Vision of the U.S. Economy Print
Written by Nicole Woo   
Thursday, 19 March 2015 08:00

At a lively press conference yesterday on Capitol Hill, the Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC), one of the largest caucuses in Congress, released The People's Budget: A Raise for America. The topline numbers are impressive: 8.4 million good-paying jobs by 2018 as well as $820 billion in infrastructure and transportation improvements and $4.6 trillion in deficit reduction over the next 10 years.

The EPI Policy Center has analyzed the People's Budget closely and finds that it would, among many outcomes, accelerate the economic recovery, promote full employment, strengthen social insurance, smartly cut spending, fairly tax the wealthy and corporations, and reduce the debt ratio to a sustainable 66 percent of GDP by 2025.

Read more...

 

 
The Real Rate of Recovery, Part 3: The Age-Adjusted EPOP Ratio Print
Written by Nicholas Buffie and Kevin Cashman   
Wednesday, 18 March 2015 13:00

Many media outlets cite the official unemployment rate – the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ U-3 unemployment rate – when reporting on the recovery in the jobs market. This rate stood at 5.0 percent in December 2007 (the first month of the recession) and rose to a high of 10.0 percent in October 2009; it has since fallen to 5.5 percent. Relative to its peak, the unemployment rate has made up 90 percent of the ground lost between December 2007 and October 2009. However, there are good reasons to think that the unemployment rate overstates the degree of recovery in the job market. We are presenting a series of five measures that provide insights on employment and unemployment that aren’t captured by the official unemployment rate. One such measure is discussed here.

Age-Adjusted Employment-to-Population (EPOP) Ratio

The age-adjusted EPOP ratio measures the percentage of Americans that would be employed if the age distribution of the population hadn’t changed since December of 2007.

Read more...

 

 
The Debt Ceiling Everybody Forgot About is Back Print
Written by Nicole Woo   
Wednesday, 18 March 2015 11:00

On Monday, the nation's debt ceiling came back into effect for the first time in over a year. Did you hear all the sighs of relief across Capitol Hill and Wall Street?

No? Nothing? That may be because over the past two years, the debt limit has been in effect for only about five months. The debt limit, also called the debt ceiling, was suspended during the rest of that time, allowing the government to borrow as much as needed to fulfill the spending and revenue levels set by Congress and the President.

Read more...

 

 
The Real Rate of Recovery, Part 2: The Prime-Age EPOP Ratio Print
Written by Nicholas Buffie and Kevin Cashman   
Monday, 16 March 2015 12:38

Many media outlets cite the official unemployment rate – the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ U-3 unemployment rate – when reporting on the recovery in the jobs market. This rate stood at 5.0 percent in December 2007 (the first month of the recession) and rose to a high of 10.0 percent in October 2009; it has since fallen to 5.5 percent. Relative to its peak, the unemployment rate has made up 90 percent of the ground lost between December 2007 and October 2009. However, there are good reasons to think that the unemployment rate overstates the degree of recovery in the job market. We are presenting a series of five measures that provide insights on employment and unemployment that aren’t captured by the official unemployment rate. One such measure is discussed here.

Seasonally Adjusted Employment-to-Population (EPOP) Ratio, Prime-Age Population

The prime-age EPOP ratio measures the percentage of Americans aged 25 to 54 who are employed.

Read more...

 

 
Labor Market Policy Research Reports, March 6 to 13 Print
Written by CEPR   
Friday, 13 March 2015 14:13

The following reports on labor market policy were recently released:

Economic Policy Institute

How Low Can We Go? State Unemployment Insurance Programs Exclude Record Numbers of Jobless Workers
Will Kimball and Rick McHugh

EPI’s Family Budgets and Income Sufficiency in Los Angeles
Elise Gould and David Cooper

Institute for Women’s Policy Research

The Status of Women in the States: 2015 — Employment and Earnings
The Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Urban Institute

How Much Could Policy Changes Reduce Poverty in New York City?
Linda Giannarelli, Laura Wheaton, and Joyce Morton

 
The Real Rate of Recovery, Part 1: The Jobless Rate Print
Written by Nicholas Buffie and Kevin Cashman   
Thursday, 12 March 2015 14:50

Many media outlets cite the official unemployment rate – the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ U-3 unemployment rate – when reporting on the recovery in the jobs market. This rate stood at 5.0 percent in December 2007 (the first month of the recession) and rose to a high of 10.0 percent in October 2009; it has since fallen to 5.5 percent. Relative to its peak, the unemployment rate has made up 90 percent of the ground lost between December 2007 and October 2009. However, there are good reasons to think that the unemployment rate overstates the degree of recovery in the job market. We are presenting a series of five measures that provide insights on employment and unemployment that aren’t captured by the official unemployment rate. One such measure is discussed here.

Seasonally Adjusted “Jobless Rate”

The "jobless rate" measures the percentage of Americans lacking a job amongst all those who say they would like to work.

Read more...

 

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 57

CEPR.net
Support this blog, donate
Combined Federal Campaign #79613
budget economy education employment Haiti health care housing inequality jobs labor labor market minimum wage paid family leave poverty recession retirement Social Security taxes unemployment unions wages Wall Street women workers working class

+ All tags