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Baker on Moyers' Journal Print
Sunday, 10 August 2008 13:05
CEPR Co-Director, Dean Baker and journalist Bob Herbert, sat down with Bill Moyers to discuss the economic challenges facing the government and the American people. Video and audio clips of the interview can be found here.
Dean Baker and Bob Herbert on Bill Moyers Journal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
International Releations and Security Network Print
Monday, 21 July 2008 13:04


We're delighted to announce that CEPR is this month's featured partner on the International Relations and Security Network (ISN) homepage. ISN provides an extensive network of free research materials for international relations scholars, as well as up-to-date current event analysis, conference listings and interactive educational content.
 
Baby Boomers Retirement Print
Monday, 30 June 2008 13:03
A recent article by MarketWatch on CEPR's latest report, "The Housing Crash and the Retirement Prospects of Late Baby Boomers," was among the ten most cited articles on their website, for the week of June 23-27.  The study, which was co-authored by Dean Baker and David Rosnick, analyzed the wealth holdings of families headed by people between the ages of 45 and 54 in 2004 and projected the wealth of families headed by people who will be in this age group in 2009. The findings are presented by income quintile under three scenarios- real house prices remain at current levels, real house prices fall by 10 percent, or real house prices fall by 20 percent. In all three scenarios, the vast majority of these families will have little or no housing wealth in 2009. Most importantly, this report should lead to a serious re-examination of policy proposals that would cut Social Security and Medicare for near retirees.
 
James in Geneva Print
Wednesday, 18 June 2008 13:04
CEPR's Director of International Programs, Deborah James, is in Geneva where she will take part in meetings and events with trade ministers and civil society organizations related to the World Trade Organization "mini-ministerial" which begins July 21. CEPR expects the negotiations to face significant challenges due to the recent spike in food prices, and the limited gains projected for developing countries.
 
Rising Economic Insecurity Print
Thursday, 29 May 2008 13:02

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The Economic Policy Institute hosted a forum called Rising Economic Insecurity, focusing on instability of household income.  Jacob S. Hacker and Elisabeth Jacobs presented their paper, “The Rising Instability of American Family Incomes, 1969-2004.”  They showed that family income variance has approximately doubled over the time period and that the percentage of working-age Americans who have experienced a catastrophic drop (more than 50%) in their family income has steadily risen to about 10%.  They found that this volatility tends to come from male head of household income, not from changing patterns of women’s labor force participation.  More research is needed to determine the sources of the volatility, which may include the impact of globalization and labor unions.  Peter Gosselin of the Urban Institute also talked about his related paper “Trends in Income Volatility and Risk, 1970-2004.” He focused on a general shift of risk from the government and businesses to households.

 
Baker Testifying on the Mortgage Crisis Print
Wednesday, 21 May 2008 13:02

 Dean Baker testified before the House Subcommittee on Domestic Policy, promoting his Subprime Borrower Protection Plan. The hearing, "Neighborhoods: the Blameless Victims of the Subprime Mortgage Crisis," focused on the effects of the meltdown of the mortgage market on neighborhoods and communities, particularly the increase in the number of vacant and abandoned properties due to foreclosures.

In an effort to provide greater housing security to families put at risk by the current crisis in the housing market, Congressman Raul Grijalva, (D-AZ) introduced a bill yesterday - with similar elements of the Subprime Borrower Protection Plan - that would allow homeowners of moderate-value homes who are facing foreclosure to remain in their homes as renters. See video of the full hearing.
 
The Man Who Told Us So Print
Monday, 19 May 2008 13:00
Co-Director, Dean Baker, spoke to the Baltimore Sun in an extensive interview about where he thinks the housing market is headed. Dean, one of the first economists to write about the existence of the housing bubble in August 2002, warned that house prices are still falling rapidly and that housing wealth could decline by as much as forty percent before the worst is over. More of Dean's work on the housing crisis can be found here. Readers can also subscribe to CEPR's Housing Market Monitor which is published weekly and provides a breakdown of the latest indicators and developments in the housing sector.
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How Bad Could It Get? Print
Tuesday, 13 May 2008 13:00
"How bad could it get?" asked the editor of Challenge: the Magazine of Economic Affairs. Their current issue features articles on the topic of economic crisis. The good news: they've published Dean Baker and John Schmitt's recession prediction paper. The bad news: the recession is going to hurt mostly everyone.
 
Baker Presentations Print
Friday, 09 May 2008 12:59
Dean Baker was in Boston on May 1, presenting his paper "Financing Prescription Drug Research: What Are the Issues?" The paper was presented at the annual conference of the Sloan Foundation's Industry Studies group.

Previously, on April 22, Dean gave a presentation on the rise and demise of the housing bubble at Bucknell University.
 
Low Wage Work in Europe Print
Tuesday, 22 April 2008 12:59

Last week, senior economist John Schmitt traveled to Amsterdam where he participated in a conference on low-wage work in Europe. The conference attracted some of the world's leading labor market economists and European policy makers who debated the meaning of the employment and wage differences between Europe and the United States.

The conference was organized to present the  findings of  research conducted over a four year period by teams in research institutions spanning five countries: the National Institute for Economic and Social Research, and the ESRC Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, Oxford/Cardiff, (UK); Arhus School of Business, (Denmark); Institut for Arbeit und Qualifikation, Universitat Duisburg, (Germany); Universite de Paris-I Sorbonne-Pantheon and Paris X/Ecole Normale Superieure, (France); and the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies (AIAS) at the University of Amsterdam and STZ Consultancy (Netherlands).

The analysis of 200 firm-level case studies showed stable rates of low pay employment of about 10 percent in Denmark and France, the rate in the Netherlands has stabilized at over 15 percent and in the United Kingdom at over 20 percent, with rapidly growing rates in Germany, which had low-wage employment rates almost as high as the 25 percent rate in the United States. However, researchers also found that low-wage workers in the European Union are generally significantly better off than their counterparts in the United States, primarily due to the social insurance provisions in the EU, including health care. The study was carried out with generous support from the Russell Sage Foundation as part of its Future of Work research program. John will be one of the editors of a volume summarizing the cross-country results of the multi-year project.

 
Baker Testifies on Turmoil in Credit Markets Print
Friday, 11 April 2008 12:58
The Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs asked Dean Baker to testify at a hearing yesterday, "Turmoil in U.S. Credit Markets: Examining Proposals to Mitigate Foreclosures and Restore Liquidity to the Mortgage Markets". Also testifying were Lawrence Summers, former U.S. Treasury Secretary, and representatives from the Center on Responsible Lending, the Brookings Institution and Lenders One, a national alliance of mortgage bankers.

Dean Baker argued that the situation in the housing market represents the largest economic crisis the country has faced since World War II. He went on to say that current legislation, while appropriate for some parts of the nation, will not address the needs of homeowners in bubble-inflated markets. You can read Dean's testimony here.
 
Myths About Venezuela Print
Thursday, 03 April 2008 12:58
The International Relations and Security Network (ISN) Publishing House, which is based in Zurich, Switzerland at the Center for Security Studies has chosen one of CEPR's latest publications as one of the editor's top picks. The paper, "An Empty Research Agenda: The Creation of Myths About Contemporary Venezuela," was written by co-director, Mark Weisbrot, as a response to a recent article in the March/April 2008 issue of Foreign Affairs that argued that Venezuela's poor have not benefited from the policies initiated byt the government of President Hugo Chávez. The ISN Publishing House is a repository of over 12,000 freely accessible policy briefs, research papers, government reports and journal articles covering a broad range of international relations and security-related topics.
 
US Policy Toward Latin America Print
Tuesday, 25 March 2008 12:57
Co-director Mark Weisbrot spoke at a panel discussion at the George Washington University Elliot School for International Affairs entitled “US Policy Toward Latin America in the Post-Bush Era”. The co-panelists included Greg Craig, a foreign policy advisor to Senator Barack Obama, Nora Lustig, a visiting professor at GWU and President of the Universidad de las Americas and Mark Schneider, the Senior Vice President and Special Advisor on Latin America at the International Crisis Group. All the participants agreed that supply-side counter-narcotics efforts in the Andes have failed. Nora Lustig discussed the possible effects of a US recession on the economies of Latin America, the topic of a recent CEPR report. Mark Weisbrot followed up on Mr. Schneider’s comments about economic inequality by underscoring the electoral consequences of Latin America’s dismal economic performance during the period of Washington-backed reforms. Recent economic policies, pursued independently of IMF advice, have lead to much higher economic growth, particularly in Argentina and Venezuela. The event was attended by an audience of over 100 policy makers, diplomats, academics, and students. A video of Mark's presentation can be viewed here.
 
Baker at Conferences Print
Friday, 21 March 2008 12:57
Co-director, Dean Baker spoke at two conferences this past week. On Tuesday, he was part of a panel at the Take Back America 2008 conference which was held in Washington, DC. His co-panelists were: Albert Meyerhoff, who has practiced for more than 30 years in labor, civil rights and environmental law; Lisa Ransom who is the Vice President of Federal Affairs for the Center for Responsible Lending, and Theresa Di Martino, an activist and consumer who was ensnared by a predatory home lender. Video of the panel discussion can be seen here. Then, on Thursday, Dean traveled to Sacramento, CA where he spoke at the annual conference of the California Budget Project on the bursting of the housing bubble and the challenges it presents to homeowners in California and across the country. More of Dean's research on the housing bubble can be found here.
 
Rosnick at Conference on Venezuela Print
Wednesday, 12 March 2008 12:56
Senior Research Associate, David Rosnick traveled last week to New Haven, CT, where he participated in a conference on Venezuela, "The Popular Sectors and the State in Chavez's Venezuela." The conference was held at Yale University where David presented a paper titled, "Illiteracy Revisited:  What Ortega and Rodriguez Read in the Household Survey." The paper was a rebuttal to Daniel Ortega and Francisco Rodriguez's argument that they had shown econometrically that the Robinson literacy program likely had no impact on reducing illiteracy in Venezuela.
 
The Future Direction of US International Economic Policy Print
Tuesday, 19 February 2008 12:56
Sponsored by the Center for American Progress (CAP), The Future Direction of US International Economic Policy brought several distinguished experts together to discuss a recent report, “Virtuous Circles: Strengthening Broad-Based Global Progress”, part of CAP’s Progressive Growth  series on the next administration’s economic policy.  The report’s lead author, Richard Samans focused the discussion on what the future of US international trade policy should be given the current context of slowing US economic growth, a constrained middle class and dramatic changes in the world economy, particularly the rapid increase of China and India’s involvement and the corresponding growth in the international labor pool.  His three-pronged approach incorporated trade, development, and monetary policy.  The effects that information-communication technology, policy regulation, capital mobility, and global labor supply are having on different countries’ living standards were incorporated into Saman’s outline of key steps toward fostering stable growth and economic equality in the United States as well as abroad.
 
Chang Discusses Bad Samaritans Print
Friday, 01 February 2008 12:54

Discussing his new book, Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism, Economics Professor at the University of Cambridge (UK) and CEPR Senior Research Associate, Ha-Joon Chang, took aim at the popular orthodoxy that in order to develop, countries need to prescribe to a strict "free trade" agenda.  Chang argued that the "developed" world, by pushing countries to pull themselves out of poverty by cutting tariffs, privatizing industries, and opening up to global competition, has perpetrated one of the greatest historical about-faces in economic history.  This engaging and provocative discussion was co-sponsored by the New America Foundation and the Center for Economic and Policy Research. If you missed this crowded event, you can watch the C-SPAN BookTV video online.

 
By a Thread Print
Wednesday, 30 January 2008 12:51
Jennifer Wheary, Thomas M. Shapiro, Caleb Gibson, and Julia Isaacs, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute, discussed "By a Thread", a new study that measures economic stability in America's middle class, at a Capitol Hill briefing. Released by Demos and the Institute for Assets and Social Policy (IASP) at Brandeis University, the study uses a new measurement, the Middle-Class Security Index, to examine the financial security of the middle class using five factors: education, assets, housing, budget and healthcare. The vulnerability highlighted by the study was thoroughly discussed, as well as a recommended set of policies to help strengthen America's middle class. Domestic Intern Hye Jin Rho was in attendance.
 
Baker Discusses Subprime Borrower Protection Plan Print
Thursday, 17 January 2008 15:31
Dean Baker discussed his Subprime Borrower Protection Plan with state legislators on a call organized by the Progressive States Network. Other speakers included Assemblyman James Brennan (NY), Representative Joe Mullery (MN), and Austin King, ACORN.
 
New Weekly Analysis of Housing Market Print
Wednesday, 09 January 2008 15:30
Today, CEPR released the Housing Market Monitor, a new weekly analysis by co-director Dean Baker. With worries of recession and a mortgage crisis, this Monitor will provide an incisive breakdown of the latest indicators and developments in the housing sector. To receive the Monitor by e-mail, sign-up here.
 
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