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Home Publications Blogs CEPR Blog CEPR Co-hosts Conference on Development, Trade, and Immigration

CEPR Co-hosts Conference on Development, Trade, and Immigration

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Friday, 07 April 2006 18:52

CEPR co-hosted a day-long conference on development, trade, and immigration with the Madrid-based think-tank Fundación Sistema (affiliated with the governing Partido Socialista Obrero Español) at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). CEPR co-directors Mark Weisbrot and Dean Baker spoke on “The Growth Slowdown in Developing Countries Over the Past 25 Years” and “Paths to Development: The Relative Impact of Trade Liberalization, Intellectual Property Protections, and Effective Industrial Policy,” respectively.

Other speakers included Branko Milanovic of the World Bank, Vicente Navarro of Johns Hopkins University, José Félix Tezanos of Fundación Sistema, Thea Lee of the AFL-CIO, Christina DeConcini of the National Immigration Forum, Rafael Simancas of the Partido Socialista Obrero Español, and Will Martin of the World Bank. Heather Boushey of  CEPR, Antonio Romero of the Fundación de las Ciudades, and Carlos Westendorp, the Spanish Ambassador to the United States, moderated the panels on growth and development, immigration, and trade, respectively.

CEPR economists and staff engaged in further productive discussion with the Spanish delegation over dinner the evening before the conference, and at a dinner and reception hosted by Ambassador Westendorp at the Embassy of Spain following the conference.

Presentations and papers from the conference are available on our website. Audio and video recordings will soon be available as well.

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