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CEPR conducts research and recommends policy solutions on a range of issues affecting women, including maternity/paid leave, health care, Social Security, childcare and work/life balance.

Reports

The Consequences of Increased Population Growth for Climate Change

December 2014, David Rosnick

Women, Working Families, and Unions

June 2014, Janelle Jones, John Schmitt, and Nicole Woo

The Economic Importance of Women’s Rising Hours of Work: Time to Update Employment Standards

April 2014, Eileen Appelbaum, Heather Boushey, and John Schmitt

Good for Business? Connecticut’s Paid Sick Leave Law

March 2014, Eileen Appelbaum, Ruth Milkman, Luke Elliott, and Teresa Kroeger

Expanding Federal Family and Medical Leave Coverage: Who Benefits from Changes in Eligibility Requirements?

February 5, 2014, Helene Jorgensen and Eileen Appelbaum

More >

Blogs

Work-Family Policies Can Stem the Decline in Women’s Employment

Health Insurance: Healthy for Entrepreneurship?

Today, ACA Boosts Voluntary Part-Time Employment

Labor Market Policy Research Reports, June 14 – June 20

Labor Market Research Reports, May 19 – June2

More >

Op-Eds & Columns

Obamacare and Family Values: Parents Get to Stay Home With Children

Dean Baker
Truthout, September 15, 2014

When Will the US Catch Up to the Rest of the World on Paid Family Leave?

Nicole Woo
The Hill, August 8, 2014

A Way to Better Pay, Benefits and Workplace Flexibility: Unions

Nicole Woo
The Hill, June 23, 2014

Modern Rules for Modern Careers

Eileen Appelbaum and Heather Boushey
US News and World Report, April 25, 2014

Mother's Day Is Different This Year

Eileen Appelbaum
The Huffington Post, May 7, 2013

More >

Events

Good News on Paid Family Leave: Political and Practical Lessons from New Jersey and California

Improving Tax Credits for New Mothers and Reducing Marriage Penalties for Low-Income Americans

National Summit on Paid Sick Days and Paid Family Leave: Turning Research Into Action

The Crisis of Care Labor and Family Leave Policies

How Does the Global Economy Impact WIC?

Briefing on Maternal and Child Health Policy

Paid Family Leave Research and Its Implications for Action

Women's Job Loss in the Recession and Recovery: Why are Men Gaining More Jobs than Women?

Leaves that Pay: Employer and Worker Experiences with Paid Family Leave in California

California's Experience with Paid Family Leave: Implications for New Jersey

More >

Press Releases

Slower Population Growth Could Significantly Reduce Carbon Emissions, Paper Finds

December 11, 2014

Contact: Dan Beeton, 202-239-1460

Washington, D.C.- A new research paper from the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) offers more evidence that slower population growth could significantly reduce carbon emissions and mitigate climate change. The paper, “The Consequences of Increased Population Growth for Climate Change” by economist David Rosnick, finds that that an additional 1 percentage point of population growth through the end of the century would coincide with about an additional 2 degrees Fahrenheit in average global temperatures. “Over time,” the paper concludes, “the temperature change is greater and becomes increasingly sensitive to population growth.”

“There are many warnings of ‘demographic time bombs’ due to population declines in countries like Japan and even China,” Rosnick said. “But lower population growth actually has many economic benefits; one of the most important is that it reduces the rate of global climate change.”

The paper explains that “A larger population requires more farmland, and increased economic activity means greater carbon emissions and more intense climate change.”

The author employs the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) to estimate the effects of population growth on the change global average temperature by 2100. Observing that a larger population supports a larger economy, which translates in close proportion into additional releases of carbon dioxide (CO2), the paper notes that global temperature should in any year be nearly linear in relation to the rate of growth when the rate of population growth is constant. 

While the author notes that technology or economics (such as reducing work hours) can produce a path of lower emissions, there also appears to be a significant climate benefit to slower population growth.

The paper notes: “There are many positive economic and social policies that can promote this transition to lower birth rates,” including “more security in old age; [t]he education of girls and women and increased economic opportunities for them, as well as affordable contraception and reproductive choice; lower infant and child mortality; [a]nd increased literacy, education levels, and productivity generally.” Moreover, the paper observes that reductions in population growth in high-income countries will have a greater impact on climate change reduction, due to “much higher per capita consumption and greenhouse gas emissions” in those countries. 

“Fears of ‘demographic crises’ from falling population growth rates in richer countries are dangerous, especially considering the implications for climate change,” Rosnick said. “In fact, not only can working-age populations continue to support larger numbers of retirees, but declining population rates are good for the planet as a whole.”

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Unions Boost Women’s Earnings, Benefits, and Workplace Flexibility

June 18, 2014

The Last Three Decades of Women’s Rising Hours of Work Added $1.7 Trillion to GDP in 2012

April 15, 2014

New Report Confirms Connecticut Business Owners’ Positive Experience with Nation’s 1st Paid Sick Days Law

March 6, 2014

Expanding FMLA Coverage Could Increase Access to More Than 8 Million Workers

February 5, 2014

More >

CEPR Work and Family Briefings
Audio files and PowerPoint presentations of five Congressional briefings on work/life issues (June - October 2006).

CEPR Economics Seminar Series
Audio and video files of ten CEPR lectures on economic issues

Life, Work and Debt for Generations X and Y
Presentation by Heather Boushey at the New America Foundation, July 27, 2006 (includes video and audio)

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Bridging the Gaps
CEPR is teaming up with state and national groups to document the persistent gaps between low-income working families' basic needs and the resources available to them.

Flat World, Big Gaps

Flat World, Big Gaps:
Economic Liberalization, Globalization, Poverty And Inequality>
with a chapter by Mark Weisbrot, Dean Baker, and David Rosnick, and a chapter co-authored by Heather Boushey
(forthcoming in May 2007)

Inequality Matters

Inequality Matters:
The Growing Economic Divide in America and Its Poisonous Consequences

with chapter co-authored by Heather Boushey
(2006)

 

 

CNNMoney.com: Moms Rise Up, Fight for Workplace Rights
January 11, 2007

 

 

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