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Globalization/Trade

CEPR looks at the impact of international financial institutions on economic growth, poverty rates, and trade around the world.

Reports

The Consequences of Increased Population Growth for Climate Change

December 2014, David Rosnick

Latin American Growth in the 21st Century: The 'Commodities Boom' That Wasn't

May 2014, David Rosnick and Mark Weisbrot

Did NAFTA Help Mexico? An Assessment After 20 Years

February 2014, Mark Weisbrot, Stephan Lefebvre, and Joseph Sammut

Gains from Trade? The Net Effect of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement on U.S. Wages

September 2013, David Rosnick

Missing the Story: The OECD's Analysis of Inequality

July 2012, David Rosnick and Dean Baker

More >

Op-Eds & Columns

A New Economic Slowdown?

Dean Baker
November 18, 2014, Politico

Election Results Indicate Huge Mandate for New Trade Pacts

Dean Baker
November 10, 2014, TruthOut

Future of WTO Negotiations Hangs in the Balance at G20 Trade Ministers' Meeting

Deborah James
The Huffington Post, July 19, 2014

The Courts Go Medieval on Argentina

Dean Baker
Al Jazeera America, July 22, 2014

BRICS’ New Financial Institutions Could Break a Long-Standing and Harmful Monopoly

Mark Weisbrot
Al Jazeera America, 18 July 2014

More >

Events

The Impact of the BRICS’ Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) and the New Development Bank (NDB)

Revisiting the Role of U.S. Trade and Economic Policies in the Central America Refugee Situation

BRICS Bank: A Challenge to Bretton Woods or More of the Same?

Economist Ha-Joon Chang signs/discusses “Economics: The User’s Guide”

United Nations Conference on Trade and Global Development 2014 Public Symposium

Jobs in the Developed World

Congressional Briefing: Critical Lessons from NAFTA for the United States and Mexico

“Lessons from NAFTA for the TPP” Did NAFTA Help Mexico?: An Assessment After 20 Years

The Importance of Macroeconomic Policy for Europe and the World Economy

The Future of Greece and the Euro Zone

More >

Press Releases

Obama’s Change of Cuba Policy is Welcome and Long Overdue; Reflects Increasing U.S. Isolation in a Latin America Mostly Run by Left Governments, Says CEPR Co-Director

For Immediate Release: December 17, 2014
Contact: Dan Beeton, 202-239-1460

Washington, D.C.- News that the Obama administration is “changing its relationship with the people of Cuba” is due to the leftward shift in Latin America that has increasingly isolated the United States politically in the region, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) Co-Director Mark Weisbrot said today. The Obama administration announced the changes following Cuba’s release of USAID contractor Alan Gross and an unnamed “intelligence asset,” and the U.S. release of the three remaining members of the “Cuban Five” who were imprisoned for espionage after working to disrupt plots by Cuban exile extremists based in the U.S. Cuba is also reportedly releasing 53 other political prisoners.

“This historic shift is a direct result of the United States’ increasing isolation in the region,” Weisbrot said. “Relations between Latin America and the Obama administration have been the worst probably of any U.S. administration in decades.  This will help, but new sanctions against Venezuela will also raise questions in the hemisphere about whether this is a change in direction or merely a giving up on a strategy that has failed for more than 50 years.

“Because of the historic transition in Latin America over the past 15 years, with left governments elected in most of the region, basically the rules and norms were changed for the whole hemisphere. Various Latin American governments – and not just those on the left – have been increasingly vocal in recent years that the status quo cannot stand, and that Cuba must be treated as an equal, and welcomed into fora such as the Summit of the Americas,” Weisbrot noted.

“Washington’s Cuba policy is being pulled into the 21st Century thanks to this regional shift.”

Weisbrot added, however: “The U.S. has pumped tens of millions into efforts to undermine left-of-center governments in Latin America, including BoliviaEcuadorVenezuela and Brazil. The just-approved appropriations bill [PDF] includes increased funding for these purposes, and the White House fact sheet on the new Cuba policy makes clear that so-called ‘democracy promotion’ will continue to be a major component. So these activities will continue to harm relations with Latin America. The U.S. still does not have full diplomatic relations with Bolivia and Venezuela.”

Weisbrot noted that the move was also made possible by an apparent willingness by the Obama administration to no longer allow Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Robert Menendez take the lead on Cuba policy. Menendez has vocally opposed the reforms announced today, and is considered a hard-liner on U.S.-Latin America policy.

Weisbrot pointed to the formation of international groupings such as the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) that include Cuba but exclude the United States, and the growing influence and pushback from regional organizations such as UNASUR (the Union of South American Nations), as more evidence of regional change that have made U.S. policy untenable.  “Obama’s decision is also a clear defeat for the Cuban-exile extremists who have dominated U.S. policy toward the region for decades, more recently with their neo-conservative allies.”

Regarding the easing of the embargo, and Obama administration recommendations that it be reconsidered by Congress, Weisbrot said: “The U.S. can no longer ignore international law and the opinion of the entire world. This is a victory for the rule of law in the world of international relations.”

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Slower Population Growth Could Significantly Reduce Carbon Emissions, Paper Finds

December 11, 2014

Contact: Dan Beeton, 202-239-1460

Washington, D.C.- A new research paper from the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) offers more evidence that slower population growth could significantly reduce carbon emissions and mitigate climate change. The paper, “The Consequences of Increased Population Growth for Climate Change” by economist David Rosnick, finds that that an additional 1 percentage point of population growth through the end of the century would coincide with about an additional 2 degrees Fahrenheit in average global temperatures. “Over time,” the paper concludes, “the temperature change is greater and becomes increasingly sensitive to population growth.”

“There are many warnings of ‘demographic time bombs’ due to population declines in countries like Japan and even China,” Rosnick said. “But lower population growth actually has many economic benefits; one of the most important is that it reduces the rate of global climate change.”

The paper explains that “A larger population requires more farmland, and increased economic activity means greater carbon emissions and more intense climate change.”

The author employs the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) to estimate the effects of population growth on the change global average temperature by 2100. Observing that a larger population supports a larger economy, which translates in close proportion into additional releases of carbon dioxide (CO2), the paper notes that global temperature should in any year be nearly linear in relation to the rate of growth when the rate of population growth is constant. 

While the author notes that technology or economics (such as reducing work hours) can produce a path of lower emissions, there also appears to be a significant climate benefit to slower population growth.

The paper notes: “There are many positive economic and social policies that can promote this transition to lower birth rates,” including “more security in old age; [t]he education of girls and women and increased economic opportunities for them, as well as affordable contraception and reproductive choice; lower infant and child mortality; [a]nd increased literacy, education levels, and productivity generally.” Moreover, the paper observes that reductions in population growth in high-income countries will have a greater impact on climate change reduction, due to “much higher per capita consumption and greenhouse gas emissions” in those countries. 

“Fears of ‘demographic crises’ from falling population growth rates in richer countries are dangerous, especially considering the implications for climate change,” Rosnick said. “In fact, not only can working-age populations continue to support larger numbers of retirees, but declining population rates are good for the planet as a whole.”

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Economists Call on Congress to Mitigate Fallout from Ruling on Argentine Debt

July 31, 2014

New Paper Finds No Evidence that Latin America’s Economic Growth Rebound Results from a “Commodities Boom”

May 21, 2014

Twenty Years after NAFTA, Mexico Has Experienced Lagging Growth, Persistent Poverty and Increased Unemployment

February 12, 2014

More >

Testimony

The Situation of Human Rights and Democracy in Honduras Since the Elections of November 2013

December 2014, Alexander Main

Other Resources

Video: Ecuador`s Debt Audit: Implications in the Global Economic Crisis
Minister of Finance of Ecuador, María Elsa Viteri, discussed the implications of the Ecuadorian debt situation in the context of the global economic crisis, including the negative impacts of deregulation of the financial markets and the lack of appropriate established international mechanisms for auditing developing country debt. December 11, 2008.

Audio and Video: Financial Turmoil and the "Solutions" -- Will it Help or Worsen the Effects on Developing Countries?
Discussion with Martin Khor, Director of the Third World Network and Mark Weisbrot, Co-Director of CEPR, regarding the regulatory mechanisms needed to prevent another similar crisis, November 18, 2008.

Audio and Video: Global Financial Stability: What Role for the IMF?
Discussion featuring Dean Baker and Mark Weisbrot, Co-Directors at CEPR. October 9, 2008.

Video: Why the World Isn`t Flat: The Truth About Globalization and the Secret History of Capitalism
Book talk
featuring CEPR Senior Research Associate Ha-Joon Chang on his book, Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism. The New America Foundation and CEPR co-sponsored this event that aired on C-SPAN`s BookTV. February 1, 2008.

Audio and Video: CEPR Economics Seminar Series
Audio and video files of ten CEPR lectures on economic issues.

IFIwatchnet

IFI Watchnet
This international network connects organizations researching the international financial institutions such as the World Bank, the IMF, and regional development banks.

Institutional Change and Economic Development Book Cover

Institutional Change and Economic Development
edited by Ha-Joon Chang
United Nations University Press (2007)

badsamaritans1.jpg

Bad Samaritans:
The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism

by Ha-Joon Chang
Bloomsbury Press (2007)

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Ten Years After:
Revisiting the Asian Financial Crisis

a free e-book with a chapter by Mark Weisbrot
Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars, Asia Program (2007)

To order a free bound copy, email asia@wilsoncenter.org.

Read More...

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