CEPR - Center for Economic and Policy Research

Multimedia

En Español

Em Português

Other Languages

Home Publications Graphic Economics

Graphic Economics

A collection of graphic representations of data by CEPR researchers on important economic issues.



Piketty in One Graph Print

This graphic summarizes the key inequality and policy trends (for the U.S.) traced in Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century. Scrolling through the inequality metrics suggest the key themes in Piketty’s examination of the U.S. case: the now-familiar “suspension bridge” of income inequality, dampened only by the exceptional economic and political circumstances of the decades surrounding World War II; the growing share of recent income gains going to the very high earners (the 1% or .01%); the stark inequality within labor income (see the top 1% and top 10% wage shares) generated by the emergence of lavishly-compensated “supermanagers”; and a concentration of wealth that fell little over the first half of the twentieth century and has grown steadily since then.

Scrolling through the policy metrics suggests some of the causal forces at work: a precipitous decline in the top inheritance and income tax rates (lifting the ceiling on high incomes); and the collapse of labor standards and bargaining power (lowering the floor for everyone else). I have added here one data series—the trajectory of union density—on which Piketty is curiously silent (his chapter on income inequality uses the minimum wage as a surrogate for bargaining power more generally).

 
A College Degree is No Guarantee: Labor-Market Outcomes for Black Recent College Grads Print

May 2014

The Great Recession has been hard on recent graduates. Black recent college graduates in particular have experienced higher unemployment rates and are more likely to find themselves in a job that does not require a degree than other recent college graduates

Download Infographic (PDF)

Blackgrads infographic

 

More information on the May 2014 report

 
Economy Adds 288,000 Jobs in April, Sharp Drop in Labor Force Leads to Plunge in Unemployment Print

May 2, 2014

The economy added 288,000 jobs in April. With upward revisions to the prior two months’ data, this brings the three month average to 234,000. This is highest three month total since the economy added 829,000 jobs in the first three months of 2012. The household survey showed unemployment rate falling from 6.7 percent in March to 6.3 percent in April, but the drop was entirely the result of 806,000 people leaving the labor force. Employment, as measured in the household survey, actually fell by 73,000. The employment-to-population ratio (EPOP) remained unchanged at 58.9 percent.

Women and white teens were the big gainers, with the unemployment rate for women falling by 0.5 percentage points to 5.7 percent. The unemployment rate for white teens fell by 2.4 percentage points to 15.9 percent. The unemployment rate for black teens increased by 0.7 percentage points to 36.8 percent, although their EPOP also rose by 1.2 percentage points. The unemployment rate for Hispanics also fell sharply from 7.9 percent to 7.3 percent.Change in Part Time Employment, By Reason

For more, see the latest Jobs Byte.

 
Reversal in Investment and Exports Slow GDP Growth in First Quarter Print

April 30, 2014

Residential construction fell at a 5.7 percent annual rate, subtracting 0.18 from growth in the quarter. Weather likely played a big role in this, as many starts were put off in the Midwest and Northeast. While construction will be contributing to growth in future quarters there will not be a big rebound. While it had averaged close to 4.5 percent of GDP in pre-bubble years (compared to around 3.0 percent now), its longer-term level is likely to be closer to 4.0 percent of GDP. This is partly due to demographics and partly due to growing cost of health care.

gdp-2014-04-ge

For more, see the latest GDP Byte.

 
Economy Adds 192,000 Jobs in March, Unemployment Rate Unchanged Print

The ACA appears to be allowing workers to opt for part-time jobs and older workers to retire early.

The economy added 192,000 jobs in March, bringing the average over the last three months to 178,000. The unemployment rate was unchanged at 6.7 percent. The employment-to-population ratio (EPOP) edged up to 58.9 percent. This is the highest of the recovery, but still four full percentage points below its pre-recession level.

This report answered several questions that had come up based on the prior two reports. First, it appears the weakness in prior months was in fact largely the result of the weather. The three month average of 178,000 is probably close to the economy's underlying trend at this point. It was also encouraging to see a jump of 0.2 hours in the length of the average workweek to 34.5 hours. This completely wipes out the decline in average hours worked that many were attributing to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and other measures.

Unincorporated Self-employed Workers as Percent of Employed, 2007 - 2014

For more, read the latest Jobs Byte.

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 2 of 30